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A Special Invite to WIM Members: Join METRANS at Fleet Week – Weds, Aug 29, 11 am, LA Harbor

Join the LA Fleet Week activities, have lunch, visit the USS Iowa, and have your own private tour of the active Navy battleships which have come to LA for the event.    http://www.lafleetweek.com/      http://www.pacificbattleship.com/

Spaces are limited, and when they are gone, they are gone!  If you’d like to join us, or just have questions, please email student assistant Lin Zhu at zhu113@usc.edu., with the following:

  • Your name
  • Your email address
  • Your date of birth
  • Your country of citizenship (international is just fine!)
  • Your cell number
  • Would you  be able to drive  carpool?

I look forward to seeing you,

Vicki

Victoria Deguzman

WIM Chair of Professional Development

Associate Director,PSR and METRANS Transportation Centers

University of Southern California

 

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Dr. Jonathan Lucas, LAC Medical Examiner-Coroner, WIM Luncheon

Dr. Lucas at the head of the table; his assistant, Isisdora Centeno, on his left. (click images for larger versions)
On Monday, July 30, 2018, USC WIM hosted Dr. Jonathan Lucas, LAC Medical Examiner-Coroner, and his assistant, Isidora Centro, at a WIM Luncheon at HSC. It was a fascinating discussion on where and how the DMEC (department of the medical examiner-coroner) fits into the vast and mysterious (to me) LA County system.

As Cynthia Henderson points out:

“Dr. Jonathan Lucas spoke to the living about the dead!

“The most surprising thing for me about Dr. Lucas was how absolutely down to earth (no pun intended), engaging, knowledgeable, and funny he was. And he brought his assistant. (We always invite the assistant, but Dr. Lucas is the first guest to bring the assistant to the luncheon. GM)

“I thoroughly enjoyed his luncheon conversation today and I learned a lot about the Los Angeles county coroner’s office DMEC (department of the medical examiner-coroner).

“I never thought about how bodies get identified but looking at a picture or asking a relative to do a quick look for identification are not the top ways of doing so. Fingerprints, Dental records, Body X-rays, even DNA are preferred.

“Around 10,000 autopsies a year are performed by a staff of approximately 250. They are especially sensitive to the needs of the family, religious practices, and the dignity and respect of those who no longer can speak for themselves.

“The DMEC’s work can provide a concrete look at what we die from the most, when, where and possibly ways to prevent accidents from happening not yet thought of.”

And Kathleen Warner was glad she was at the luncheon:

“USC’s Women in Management organized a luncheon meeting with Dr. Jonathan Lucas, L.A. County’s Medical Examiner-Coroner, on July 30, 2018 at Norris Medical Library on the Health Science Campus. Dr. Lucas is a board certified forensic pathologist and was appointed to his position by the Los Angeles Board of Supervisors in June 2017.

“Dr. Lucas shared with the group the myriad tasks performed by the Medical Examiner’s office from determining cause and manner of death to analyzing DNA samples to help identify who has died. Dr. Lucas stressed the importance of serving the residents of the County of Los Angeles, especially a decedent’s loved ones, in the processing of the cases the office handles. The Los Angeles County Medical Examiner’s office is the busiest medical examiner’s office in the country.

“Dr. Lucas assumed management of the County’s Medical Examiner office at a time of concern over case backlog and inadequate staffing. Dr. Lucas described the strides the office has made in addressing these issues and the plans he has for further strengthening office procedures. As busy as the DMEC’s office is, WIM is most appreciative of Dr. Lucas generously sharing his time to speak at its luncheon.”

This was a very relaxed and relaxing luncheon. The conversation, and it really was a conversation, was so congenial and flowing, I even dispensed with the written question demand I usually make. Dr. Lucas even did his own introduction, mentioning that he’s a native Californian, worked for the New York City Medical Examiner until October 1, 2001 (yes, he worked on 911 in the NYC morgue). He moved back to California to be the Assistant ME for San Diego County. Then, as he told us, 1 year and 20 days prior to our luncheon, Dr. Lucas took over as the LA County Chief Medical Examiner. The hour and a half flew by as Dr. Lucas talked about how the addition to our morgue of an in-house DNA lab returns results in 2 weeks, as opposed to the 3 months when they used to send it to another lab. He listed the ways Jane/John Doe bodies are identified, and that a recently purchased CAT scanner has been a valuable tool for this task. He graciously answered questions about how bodies of various religious faiths receive the most sensitive and respectful treatment possible in each case. There was also some discussion on the ages of children who pass through the morgue, and how his department works with Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) and the LAPD in certain cases. And it was all thoughtful and practical information on things I don’t spend a lot of time thinking about. (Okay, full disclosure, since I’ve reached the age where I will not live as long as I have already lived, DEATH does cross my mind a little more often, but rarely do I think about the dead.) Yes, rarely do I think about the dead, but I am greatly relieved that if I die in LA County, the DMEC will be there for my remains. And I feel proud that Dr. Lucas is leading that department because he said: “We care for the dead in service of the living.” He went on to explain that his department provides answers on why and how that person died to their family, friends, and community — all the people who will grieve for and remember the deceased. And this is why I hope Dr. Lucas will be LAC Chief Medical Examiner for many years to come, and I’m very glad he made time to talk with us on Monday, July 30, 2018.

Also, I was delighted to meet his assistant, Isidora Centro. She told me she’s been with the County for 30 years, but she’s not going to retire until Dr. Lucas retires, so he must be a great boss.

Many thanks to Cynthia Henderson and Kathleen Warner for sharing their thoughts on the luncheon with me and refreshing my memory. Thank you to Janet Schmidt for the photos.

Also, if you were at the luncheon, and want to share your thoughts, I’ll be happy to post them here if you email them to me. I thought we had comments on WIM blog posts, but it seems not to be. You all know where to find me. GM

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Board Transition Lunch: Mission and Vision

USC WIM Board members attended the annual transition lunch held in July to honor outgoing members, to welcome incoming members, and to kick off a new season of empowering the women of USC! This year we ventured to the Artist’s District’s Zinc Café. Board Members Leonette Williams and Bernice Taylor were honored for their service as they step off the board. Leonette Williams has been a part of USC Women in Management since its inception forty years ago. She served various roles over the years and returned to serve the past four years as WIM’s Vice President, ensuring that the HERS Institute scholarship continues well into the future. We welcomed new board members: Dana Coyle, Karen Escobar, Victoria Esquer and Janet Schmidt.

 

As a group we talked of being grounded and powerful as individuals and coming together as a community of like-minded individuals to continue to provide our members the strength of this organization. We discussed the desire to include more members in the creation of events via subcommittees to brainstorm the upcoming year’s programming. We noted that our mission “to empower the women of USC” remains as it did since the inception of Women in Management in 1979; however, what is our vision? Members agreed it had to do with creating a cohesive leadership program, connecting with senior leadership, developing deeper relations with other organizations doing similar work within our university and throughout higher education. We agreed that getting feedback of members-at-large as how to even better serve us all was critical.

 

We reiterated the fact that our organization was formed by twenty like-minded women at the University of Southern California (USC) in 1979 who followed the need: to empower the women who work at USC and to have women represented in the leadership positions at the university. From our own About Us page: “The compelling forces driving the formation of Women in Management included the need for increased representation of women in responsible University positions, equal pay for men and women holding similar positions, and the provision of a forum in which women could develop leadership skills.”

 

The organization was not offered by the institution; it was a community created by like-minded, forward-thinking individuals who felt compelled to come together to make the changes they sought and were needed.

 

Let us continue to follow the need and to offer a platform that will propel women to the highest levels of responsibility at USC. Let us build a network of like-minded women who will support and empower each other at every level of the institution. Let us all take ownership of the positions we hold and lead at every level.

 

The board looks forward to serving us all as we head into the 40th celebration of this organization that has served the women of USC since 1979!

 

Fight on!

 

Kristine

Your 2018-19 USC WIM President

 

 

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June Member Highlight: Stacy Patterson Performs in “A Reasonable Fear of Tubas”

WIM Past-President and incoming Member-at-Large, Stacy Patterson goes solo in her one-person show at the Hollywood Fringe Festival with shows running now through mid-June.

A Reasonable Fear of Tubas explores what scares us, whether real or imagined, in human or fish form. If we are all afraid of something (and we are, right?) then what might life after facing our fear look like? Perhaps, it’s a bit more reasonable.

In addition to her work as a Program Manager in the School of Cinematic Arts, Stacy is a producer, storyteller and coach. After earning her BA in Fine Arts with an emphasis in theatre from the University of New Mexico, Stacy moved to Los Angeles and began working in film and television production and local theater. This is her first Fringe Festival though. Oh, and she’s seriously, (and often) hilariously scared of sharks, so she doesn’t get to the beach much.

The Hollywood Fringe Festival is at The Actors Company’s Let Live Theater. For more information and tickets, see the attached flyer or visit the show site at www.hff18.org/5349. (Enter discount code WIM for $10 tickets.)

 

Are you a WIM Member with an event, or talent, to share? Contact Shu Li to be considered for our monthly Member Highlight.

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Provost and Senior Vice Presidents Discuss the State of the University

Reposted from the USC Employee Gateway: https://employees.usc.edu/provost-svps-discuss-state-of-the-university/

Provost, SVPs discuss State of the University

The Women in Management (WIM) annual “State of the University” luncheon drew attendees from across USC campus locations to the Davidson Continuing Education Center last Thursday for a chance to hear from Provost Michael Quick as well as Senior Vice President of Finance Jim Staten, and University General Counsel Carol Mauch Amir.

Provost Quick recapped the recently updated strategic plan, and discussed USC’s dedication to diversity and inclusion. He also shared USC’s record-breaking number of undergraduate applicants this year – almost 64,000 applied, leading to USC’s most exclusive freshman class incoming this fall.

Carol Mauch Amir discussed her journey at USC, and noted that the number of incredible women in management positions has continued to grow over the years. She celebrated the accomplishment of USC Village opening, and highlighted upcoming projects the university has underway, including the Coliseum remodel, and USC’s involvement in the 2028 Olympics to be hosted in Los Angeles.

Jim Staten reviewing the university’s financial accomplishments over the past year, and shared plans USC intends to implement to face ongoing challenges, like those posed by recent federal and state legislation regarding tax reform.

As in previous years, the leaders addressed the crowd in a brief Q&A that allowed attendees to ask their own questions.

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WIM and METRANS Lunch with USC Trustee Suzanne Dworak-Peck

Reposted from METRANS, Pacific Southwest Region 9 UTC 

Sunday, March 25, 2018 – 9:45pm

By Richard Aviles, USC MSW MPL 2019

On March 6th, 2018, at the USC Doheny Memorial Library, USC Women in Management (WIM) and METRANS hosted USC alum Suzanne Dworak-Peck in a lunch conversation centered around her life and career, her principles, and her advice. Suzanne Dworak-Peck has served as President of the National Association of Social Work, is a member of the USC Board of Trustees, and is a proud social work practitioner, and generously provided the naming gift for the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work. We appreciate her sharing her time and thoughts with us, and both WIM and METRANS for making this event possible.

Dworak-Peck stressed to the audience of students, faculty, staff, and practitioners from varied backgrounds know that at the center of her work and career, the values of social work have been at her core.  She noted that, as conveyed by the NASW’s Code of Ethics, social workers strive for “competence, dignity and worth of the person, human relationships, and social justice,” and these have been her guiding principles in all aspects of her life.

Dworak-Peck began her talk with a dilemma too common in the social work profession; for those people outside of the profession, social workers are believed to be simply “baby snatchers.” Dworak-Peck explained that the portrayal of social workers in the media does not do justice to the intricacies and pedagogy of the profession. As a dual degree student in Social Work and Planning, I am striving to follow in the legacy of Dworak-Peck: a nontraditional social work practitioner striving to find nontraditional solutions.

She reminded us that at a time where we have social movements like Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, and Gun Violence Reform, it is more imperative than ever that we all reconnect to the principle of social justice. Dworak-Peck added that said principles are not limited to just the social work profession. As an example, she applied the NASW Code of Ethics in her real estate business, and believes that social workers can be, and work hand in hand with, developers, planners, artists, and politicians. Social workers, in the words of Suzanne Dworak-Peck, are driven by empathy; in a world that seems to be disconnected and disengaged, now is the time for social workers, and truly all of us, to step to the forefront and remind the world of the power of empathy and human connection.

About the Author: Richard Aviles

Aviles is a dancer, choreographer, and dual degree student. As an artist, Aviles focuses on choreographing queer and feminist theories in American Modern Dance. As a student, Aviles is interested in using his background in choreography to further his interest in spatial analysis and the role of social workers in the development process.

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9 reasons good employees quit

“It’s pretty incredible how often you hear managers complaining about their best employees leaving, and they really do have something to complain about—few things are as costly and disruptive as good people walking out the door.

“Managers tend to blame their turnover problems on everything under the sun, while ignoring the crux of the matter: people don’t leave jobs; they leave managers.

“The sad thing is that this can easily be avoided. All that’s required is a new perspective and some extra effort on the manager’s part.”
9 Things That Make Good Employees Quit, by Travis Bradberry, Forbes, February 23, 2016


And don’t forget to check our calendar for exciting new events.