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Dr. Jonathan Lucas – LA County Medical Examiner

Dr. Jonathan Lucas Luncheon
July 30, 2018
USC Health Sciences Campus
Norris Medical Library West Conference Room
Noon to 1:30pm
WIM Members $18; non-members $20
https://uscwim.org/product/dr-jonathan-lucas-la-county-coroner/

What is the role of the Department of the Medicial Examiner-Coroner in LA County?

“The citizens of Los Angeles County expect that their dead will be treated with dignity and respect. The Department of the Medical Examiner-Coroner (DMEC) and the Office of Decedent Affairs (ODA) in the Department of Health Services (DHS) provide services to transport, examine, and cremate or bury the county’s dead, depending on the circumstances surrounding a particular death.”

This is from the Grand Jury report “How do we Care for the Dead when the Dead don’t Vote” last year prior to Dr. Jonathan Lucas’ appointment as LA County Coroner. Dr. Lucas became Medical Examiner a year ago when he assumed leadership of an organization that was the subject of a Grand Jury investigation (see below for a link to the report). Join us for lunch on July 30, to learn how his department runs and operates in LA County, LA City and the state of California.
Continue reading Dr. Jonathan Lucas – LA County Medical Examiner

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Stop Apologizing: Letting Go of Communication Habits That Get in The Way

Thursday, July 26, 2018
8:30 to 10am
Norris Medical Library West Conference Room
WIM members no charge; non-members $10
https://uscwim.org/product/stop-apologizing-letting-go-of-communication-habits-that-get-in-the-way/

Why Do We Apologize So Much? Have we fallen into the over-apologizing trap? Have you ever said “I’m sorry” for things that don’t merit an apology in the first place? It’s a habit that can morph into a reflex reaction. Over-apologizing can not only be exhausting to you, but also to everyone around you. Join us for a WIM Professional Development session on communication. This session will be at Norris Medical Library West Conference Room, from 8:30 to 10am, Thursday, July 26, 2018. If you can’t attend in person, please contact Ginger Mayerson (mayerson@usc.edu) about attending remotely.

Continue reading Stop Apologizing: Letting Go of Communication Habits That Get in The Way

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S.W.O.T. Analysis: Leveraging Your Personal and Professional Best Through Reflection

Tuesday, July 24, 2018
8:30 to 10am
Norris Medical Library West Conference Room
WIM members no charge; non-members $10
https://uscwim.org/product/s-w-o-t-analysis-leveraging-your-personal-and-professional-best-through-reflection/

As leaders we lead from all levels of the organization. We are self-reflective and forward thinking. In this workshop, we will use the foundation of the SWOT analysis tool to explore our own experiences in a creative and aspirational way. In turn, we will examine how we may best use our expertise and understanding to inspire others, our departments, and our organization. This session will be at Norris Medical Library West Conference Room, from 8:30 to 10am, Tuesday, July 24, 2018.
Continue reading S.W.O.T. Analysis: Leveraging Your Personal and Professional Best Through Reflection

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The woman behind Health Equity in LA County

Dr. Barbara Ferrer Luncheon
July 19, 2018
USC Health Sciences Campus
Norris Medical Library West Conference Room
Noon to 1:30pm
$18 WIM Members; $20 non-members
https://uscwim.org/product/dr-barbara-ferrer-director-of-la-county-public-health/

Ever wondered what those billboards and bus ads were about? On July 19, 2018, you can have lunch with the woman at the top of the department powering Health Equity in LA County. Dr. Barbara Ferrer will be speaking at HSC Norris Medical Library West Conference room at noon on July 19. To register for this event, please click here https://uscwim.org/product/dr-barbara-ferrer-director-of-la-county-public-health/ as soon as possible. Registration closes at 6pm on July 16, so please don’t delay.

“The Department of Public Health (DPH) is facilitating Health Agency efforts to establish a Center for Health Equity. The Center’s mission is to ensure all individuals have access to the opportunities and resources needed for optimal health and well-being by advancing racial, social and environmental justice in partnership with committed organizations and residents.

“The guiding principles for the Center include a belief in dismantling a system that assigns human value based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, and/or religious affiliation; using data to drive action amplifying community voices through engagement in planning, implementation, analysis, and reporting; and building multi-sector partnerships that advance health equity.”
Promoting Health Equity in Los Angeles

Also, County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health Strategic Plan 2018-2023

And Dr. Ferrer’s “Building Health Equity” presentation for the “From Data to Action: Building Health Equity for Women in Los Angeles” conference on January 31, 2018.

Some highlights from her keynote presentation:

We hope you can join us for a fascinating luncheon with Dr. Ferrer.

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“Amazing!” “Inspiring!” “A revealing perspective” is what people said about Dr. Barbara Ferrer last summer

Summer 2017, Dr. Ferrer was new on the job as Director of LA County Public Health, and lit up the NML West Conference room with her vision of what LA County healthcare could, can, and will be on her watch.

So we are delighted that she returns this year to share her progress over the past year with us.

Here’s what she said in an interview in May:

“Our 35,000-member workforce across the Health Agency are deeply committed and skilled professionals, with a passion for caring for our most vulnerable residents. As we acknowledge our need to focus on preventing disease (and not only healing), we will all need to embark on a learning journey to acquire or strengthen the skills to do health equity work. For example, we all need to build our skills around respecting and honoring diversity, including cultural humility and linguistic competency. We need to know how to confidently speak about racism and its generational impact on health, while simultaneously elevating the voices and experiences of the people we serve. We need to figure out how to defer to and embrace community leadership. People have the inherent capacity to understand themselves, their circumstances, and the solutions to address their challenges and we must be prepared to create spaces for meaningful ongoing interaction and problem solving.

“As our academic and workforce training partners help prepare the next generation of healthcare workers, our hope is that increased opportunities will be available for under-represented youth and residents to participate in health career training and academic programming, so that the health care workforce represents the diversity of the residents we serve. We would ask that an emphasis is placed on creating career paths that honor lived experience and reflect team learning through a culture of continuous improvement.”
Q & A WITH COMMISSIONER FERRER, California Future Health Workforce Commission, May 15, 2018

Places at the luncheon are dwindling, so please don’t delay registering for the July 19, 2018 event at HSC. Registration closes at noon on July 16.

Dr. Barbar Ferrer
Thursday, July 19, 2018, Noon to 1:30, Norris Library West Conference Room.
Click here to Register

Continue reading “Amazing!” “Inspiring!” “A revealing perspective” is what people said about Dr. Barbara Ferrer last summer

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June Member Highlight: Stacy Patterson Performs in “A Reasonable Fear of Tubas”

WIM Past-President and incoming Member-at-Large, Stacy Patterson goes solo in her one-person show at the Hollywood Fringe Festival with shows running now through mid-June.

A Reasonable Fear of Tubas explores what scares us, whether real or imagined, in human or fish form. If we are all afraid of something (and we are, right?) then what might life after facing our fear look like? Perhaps, it’s a bit more reasonable.

In addition to her work as a Program Manager in the School of Cinematic Arts, Stacy is a producer, storyteller and coach. After earning her BA in Fine Arts with an emphasis in theatre from the University of New Mexico, Stacy moved to Los Angeles and began working in film and television production and local theater. This is her first Fringe Festival though. Oh, and she’s seriously, (and often) hilariously scared of sharks, so she doesn’t get to the beach much.

The Hollywood Fringe Festival is at The Actors Company’s Let Live Theater. For more information and tickets, see the attached flyer or visit the show site at www.hff18.org/5349. (Enter discount code WIM for $10 tickets.)

 

Are you a WIM Member with an event, or talent, to share? Contact Shu Li to be considered for our monthly Member Highlight.

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Provost and Senior Vice Presidents Discuss the State of the University

Reposted from the USC Employee Gateway: https://employees.usc.edu/provost-svps-discuss-state-of-the-university/

Provost, SVPs discuss State of the University

The Women in Management (WIM) annual “State of the University” luncheon drew attendees from across USC campus locations to the Davidson Continuing Education Center last Thursday for a chance to hear from Provost Michael Quick as well as Senior Vice President of Finance Jim Staten, and University General Counsel Carol Mauch Amir.

Provost Quick recapped the recently updated strategic plan, and discussed USC’s dedication to diversity and inclusion. He also shared USC’s record-breaking number of undergraduate applicants this year – almost 64,000 applied, leading to USC’s most exclusive freshman class incoming this fall.

Carol Mauch Amir discussed her journey at USC, and noted that the number of incredible women in management positions has continued to grow over the years. She celebrated the accomplishment of USC Village opening, and highlighted upcoming projects the university has underway, including the Coliseum remodel, and USC’s involvement in the 2028 Olympics to be hosted in Los Angeles.

Jim Staten reviewing the university’s financial accomplishments over the past year, and shared plans USC intends to implement to face ongoing challenges, like those posed by recent federal and state legislation regarding tax reform.

As in previous years, the leaders addressed the crowd in a brief Q&A that allowed attendees to ask their own questions.

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WIM and METRANS Lunch with USC Trustee Suzanne Dworak-Peck

Reposted from METRANS, Pacific Southwest Region 9 UTC 

Sunday, March 25, 2018 – 9:45pm

By Richard Aviles, USC MSW MPL 2019

On March 6th, 2018, at the USC Doheny Memorial Library, USC Women in Management (WIM) and METRANS hosted USC alum Suzanne Dworak-Peck in a lunch conversation centered around her life and career, her principles, and her advice. Suzanne Dworak-Peck has served as President of the National Association of Social Work, is a member of the USC Board of Trustees, and is a proud social work practitioner, and generously provided the naming gift for the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work. We appreciate her sharing her time and thoughts with us, and both WIM and METRANS for making this event possible.

Dworak-Peck stressed to the audience of students, faculty, staff, and practitioners from varied backgrounds know that at the center of her work and career, the values of social work have been at her core.  She noted that, as conveyed by the NASW’s Code of Ethics, social workers strive for “competence, dignity and worth of the person, human relationships, and social justice,” and these have been her guiding principles in all aspects of her life.

Dworak-Peck began her talk with a dilemma too common in the social work profession; for those people outside of the profession, social workers are believed to be simply “baby snatchers.” Dworak-Peck explained that the portrayal of social workers in the media does not do justice to the intricacies and pedagogy of the profession. As a dual degree student in Social Work and Planning, I am striving to follow in the legacy of Dworak-Peck: a nontraditional social work practitioner striving to find nontraditional solutions.

She reminded us that at a time where we have social movements like Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, and Gun Violence Reform, it is more imperative than ever that we all reconnect to the principle of social justice. Dworak-Peck added that said principles are not limited to just the social work profession. As an example, she applied the NASW Code of Ethics in her real estate business, and believes that social workers can be, and work hand in hand with, developers, planners, artists, and politicians. Social workers, in the words of Suzanne Dworak-Peck, are driven by empathy; in a world that seems to be disconnected and disengaged, now is the time for social workers, and truly all of us, to step to the forefront and remind the world of the power of empathy and human connection.

About the Author: Richard Aviles

Aviles is a dancer, choreographer, and dual degree student. As an artist, Aviles focuses on choreographing queer and feminist theories in American Modern Dance. As a student, Aviles is interested in using his background in choreography to further his interest in spatial analysis and the role of social workers in the development process.